Irish

Francis Danby

Francis Danby was an Irish painter of the Romantic era. His imaginative, dramatic landscapes were comparable to those of John Martin. Danby initially developed his imaginative style while he was the central figure in a group of artists who have come to be known as the Bristol School. His period of greatest success was in London in the 1820s.

Francis Bacon

Francis Bacon was an Irish-born British figurative painter known for his bold, grotesque, emotionally charged and raw imagery. His painterly abstracted figures are typically isolated in glass or steel geometrical cages, set against flat, nondescript backgrounds. Bacon took up painting in his early 20s but worked sporadically and uncertainly until his mid-30s. Unsure of his ability, he drifted as a highly complex bon vivant, homosexual, gambler and interior decorator and designer of furniture, rugs and bathroom tiles.

William Michael Harnett

William Michael Harnett was an Irish-American painter known for his trompe-l'œil still lifes of ordinary objects. The style of trompe-l'œil painting that Harnett developed was distinctive and inspired many imitators, but it was not without precedent. A number of 17th century Dutch painters, Pieter Claesz for instance, had specialized in tabletop still life of astonishing verisimilitude. Raphaelle Peale, working in Philadelphia in the early 19th century, pioneered the form in America.

Frederic William Burton

Sir Frederic William Burton RHA was an Irish painter born in Co. Wicklow on 8 April 1816, the third son of Samuel Frederick Burton and his wife Hanna Mallett. The old Burton seat was Clifden, Corofin, Co.Clare, which was built around the middle of the eighteenth century. The artist's grandparents were Major Edward William Burton, Clifden, who was High Sherriff of Clare in 1799, and his wife, Jane Blood of nearby Roxton. Sir Frederick was the third director of the National Gallery, London.